One Last Push? Why?

Polio is history for many of us. The disease which paralysed generations is now on the run and only survives in hard-to-reach places. Even so, it’s still hanging on, infecting children. So today we’re in a race to get to them before the virus does. Watch this video to see the incredible efforts volunteers and health workers are making in order to do this.

So very close.

The good news is we’re very close to making polio history everywhere in the world. Volunteers and health workers are doing everything they can to get the vaccine through to everyone they can. So
we’re now on the brink of eradicating polio forever.

A polio-free world by 2020?
Not without One Last Push.

Organisations, governments and individuals all over the world have been pulling out all the stops and data from the Global Polio Eradication Initiative confirms that a polio-free world is possible in the next few years. We can’t let up now. One Last Push is backing these people everywhere so that we can achieve a polio-free world by 2020 and ensure every child everywhere can escape the crippling effects of the disease.

The generation that suffered under polio

Watch these polio survivors talk about their experiences of polio.

Read More
Ramesh Ferris

Ramesh

Ramesh Ferris is a 36-year-old polio survivor who was born in Coimbatore, India. At the age of six months he contracted polio and his legs were paralyzed for life. At the age of one Ramesh’s birth mother Lakshmi, unable to care for him, placed him in an orphanage.

Read his story
Meet Barbara – polio survivor who tells her story

Meet Barbara – polio survivor who tells her story

Barbara was on a train from Dudley, Worcestershire with her family for a summer holiday when she was a child. Shortly after, she began to show symptoms that her doctors later discovered to be polio.

Read her story
CREDITED TO:  Abhishek Bali/ACTION

Parliamentarians from around the world attend One Last Push Summit

Parliamentarians from the UK, Canada and Japan visited New Delhi during the week of 4 April to learn how the knowledge and learning acquired from polio eradication in India can be transitioned into other global health programmes and individual countries’ health systems.

Read More